skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.
skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.

skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.

(via npr)

npr:

Shotgun’s loaded. It’s pointing toward a hunter’s backside. Fido gets excited and steps on the weapon. And … you can imagine the rest. Fortunately, the man’s going to be OK.

Wait. Wasn’t this an episode of 30 Rock?

ilovecharts:

via Beth

Click through to see Science In Reality

My father, who is a biochemist and therefore does Science for a Living, can confirm the accuracy of the second chart. He also adds:

Instead of Melvin deleting the calibration, he sends an email to everyone about the instrument calibration expiring tomorrow which stems from him not reading an email clearly, then Claudia replies-all with a meeting invite to a completely different topic and doesn’t change the subject line but includes 3 more people who can’t address either the calibration issue or Claudia’s topic other than point out more problems that require rewriting and approving document revisions before Kim can do her work. Meanwhile… Kevin passes on a request for a PowerPoint presentation summary of Kim’s work and how it will be completed by the end of the week even though he was sitting in the meeting reading and sending email while Kim was explaining why she can’t get her assignment done for at least another 2 weeks.

So there you have it—Science. It involves a lot of oblivious people sending useless emails? Oh, and also some experiments.

(via npr)

The first song off this EP is nothing short of adorable. ^_^

I mean, it’s an EP all about NPR! Silly, but endearingly so!